Friday, March 24, 2017

There is no such thing as genuine knowledge of God that does not show itself in obedience to His Word and will. Sinclair Ferguson

 

Monday, March 13, 2017

CONFESSION & FORETELLING - LUKE 9:17-22

Confession & Foretelling
9:17-22

After ministering to the crowds, Jesus spent time alone with the disciples. He prayed. Then he taught them. First, he drew out their understanding by questions. Then he taught them more about himself. This is often how the Lord works on us. He teaches us a little. When we understand it, he teaches us more.

Jesus first asked the disciples who the crowds said he was. The disciples named several prophets. But then, Jesus put them on the spot. He asked who they said he was. In other words, he wanted to know what they believed about him.

Peter answered for the disciples. He said Jesus was the Christ of God. (20) what did Peter mean by this? Christ is an Anglicized version of the Greek word Christos. It translates the Hebrew word for Anointed One.

If you speak and read English, you know the word Messiah. That is an Anglicized version of the Hebrew word for Anointed One. “Messiah” and “Christ” mean the same thing, they refer to the same person. You can see this in John 1:41, where John used the word “Messiah”, then explained that it meant the “Christ”. This is the one God promised in the Old Testament, the one who would come and save God's people.

Peter confessed Jesus was God's Anointed and promised One. It shows two things about Peter: (1) he understood who Jesus claimed to be and (2) he believed it.

You may be more familiar with Matthew's version, which is longer. Peter also confessed Jesus was the Son of God. (Matthew 16:16) Jesus also said God revealed it to Peter. And he went on to speak of building his church. But, we will stick with our text in Luke. Luke's shortened version actually makes a dramatic point.

That dramatic point is made when Jesus responded to Peter's confession by saying: saying, "The Son of Man must suffer many things and be rejected by the elders and chief priests and scribes, and be killed, and on the third day be raised." (Luke9.22)

This was a startling response. Most Jews expected the Christ to be a warrior who would restore the Jewish kingdom by force. Jesus quashed that thought immediately. He cast himself as the suffering servant as opposed to the warrior. He painted a gruesome word picture that progressed from bad to worse.

First, he would suffer many things. We know that he did. “But what God foretold by the mouth of all the prophets, that his Christ would suffer, he thus fulfilled.”   (Acts 3.18)


Second, he would be rejected by the leaders of his own people. John 1:11 says "He came to his own, and his own people did not receive him." He was tried before the high priest, who rejected his claims.

Third, he would be killed. That had to be a shock to the disciples. In fact, we know they did not understand it or believe it.

At the end of this bad news was good news, though. In fact, maybe the best news in history: on the third day he would be raised. Sadly, we know the disciples did not understand or believe this, either.

Regardless of the disciples lack of understanding, Jesus had set before them a road map of the rest of his ministry. It was not victory in warfare, it was suffering. He would be humiliated. He would be tortured. He would be killed in a gruesome manner. Redemption would come through death, death on our behalf, bearing our sins, suffering our punishment, so that we might be reconciled to God.

Victory would come, though. Victory over death and the grave would come with his resurrection.

Though the disciples did not believe this at first, they did come to believe it. Peter, at Pentecost, after Christ 's ascension, preached a powerful sermon. He said:  "Men of Israel, hear these words: Jesus of Nazareth, a man attested to you by God with mighty works and wonders and signs that God did through him in your midst, as you yourselves know-this Jesus, delivered up according to the definite plan and foreknowledge of God, you crucified and killed by the hands of lawless men.God raised him up, loosing the pangs of death, because it was not possible for him to be held by it. For David says concerning him, "'I saw the Lord always before me, for he is at my right hand that I may not be shaken; therefore my heart was glad, and my tongue rejoiced; my flesh also will dwell in hope. For you will not abandon my soul to Hades, or let your Holy One see corruption. You have made known to me the paths of life; you will make me full of gladness with your presence.' (Acts 2.22-28)

You, too, must believe in Christ's resurrection. Paul wrote: "But what does it say? "The word is near you, in your mouth and in your heart" (that is, the word of faith that we proclaim); because, if you confess with your mouth that Jesus is Lord and believe in your heart that God raised him from the dead, you will be saved.” (Romans 10.8-9)

It is this glorious truth that gives us hope for eternity. For, as we share in his death, so we will share in his resurrection.


Sunday, March 12, 2017

FEEDING THE FIVE THOUSAND - LUKE 9:10-17

Feeding Five Thousand
9:10-17

This event occurred when the Twelve returned from their mission trip. Jesus took them to Bethsaida, evidently with the intent of listening to what they had done and having time with them. However, the crowds learned where they were and followed them. (10)

Jesus did not tell them to go away because he and the Twelve had things to do. Instead, he welcomed them. (11) He taught them about the kingdom of God. He healed the sick. He did this all day long.

At the end of the day, The Twelve told Jesus to send the crowd away for food and lodging. (12) The reason for this is not given. It may be that the Twelve wanted to call it a day, so they wanted Jesus to wrap it up. In the alternative, they may have been concerned for people who had been there all day and would have to travel home in the dark with no food and no place along the way to stay. 

Jesus did not go along with their idea. Instead, he commanded the apostles to give the crowd something to eat. They canvassed the crowed for food and came up with only five loaves of bread and two fish. Evidently, this was a kid’s sack lunch. They also brought up the idea of getting take out, going and buying food. They surely did not have enough money for that, since there were about five thousand men there, along with a number of women and children.

The apostles were trying to obey Jesus. But they only went about it in practical, physical ways. They tried to find food in the crowd. They suggested an alternative, although an untenable one. They did not look beyond the practical. They also did not think about the lesson they had just learned on their mission trip: that God will provide for those who preach and minister in his name.

Jesus, on the other hand, took what the disciples had and multiplied it into enough to feed the crowd. He also made enough leftovers to have 12 baskets, no doubt one for each of the Twelve who were still limited in their thinking.

God had miraculously provided food to his people before this. He fed the Israelites in the desert with manna and quail. (Exodus 16-18)

The Lord also fed 100 prophets who followed Elisha with 20 loaves of barley and some grain from a man’s sack. (2 Kings 4:42) These events, along with Jesus feeding the five thousand, are things only God could do.

 These events also show us Jesus’ compassion for people. He was not willing to send them away angry. He was not willing to make them fend for themselves.

It also shows us something of the nature and character of the Father. Jesus revealed the Father to us. John 1:18 says “No one has ever seen God; the only God, who is at the Father’s side, he has made him known”.

As Jesus had compassion on the crowds and met their physical needs, so the Father cares for us, has compassion for us and provides for our physical needs. 1 Peter 5:7 tells us to cast or anxieties on God because he cares for us. 


God knows you. God cares for you. God will provide for you.

Rest in that. 

Sunday, March 05, 2017

TRAINING THE TWELVE - LUKE 9:1-17

9:1-6 The First Mission Trip

This is the story of the first mission trip. Today we might think of this as as part of an internship. First Jesus taught the disciples and let them hang out with him, seeing how he preached and healed. Then he sent them out to do the work.

Before sending out the Twelve, Jesus gathered them together and gave them authority over demons and diseases. He could  give this authority because this authority had been given to him. In Matthew 28:18, Jesus said “all authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me”.

He demonstrated this authority when he cast multiple demons out of 
the Garasene man. He demonstrated his authority over disease by raising Jairus’s daughter from death and healing many others.

The disciples witnessed these things. They knew his authority from experience. Thus, they could believe they could receive such authority from him. Jesus also gave them the power to heal and cast out demons. Power is the ability to do it. Authority is the right to do it.
 
Having given them authority & power, he sent them out to proclaim the kingdom of God and to heal. (2)  Thus the Twelve would preach the arrival of the kingdom and demonstrate its truth with miraculous signs.
 
Jesus inaugurated the kingdom at his first coming and will consummate it at his second coming. Jesus and the Twelve all proclaimed the arrival of the kingdom and demonstrated it by taking territory away from the present lord of the earth, Satan. They took it away every time they cast out demons and heal people.

The kingdom was not physical territory, as many Jews expected. It was, instead, God’s rule over the hearts of his people. Jesus could free people from slavery to sin, from the curse of the fall, and give them life to live for the glory of God.

Jesus also put the Twelve to a test of faith. He did not allow them to take any provisions, no food, no money, no extra clothes. They would stay with the first person that welcomed them. Jesus was telling them “go as you are”.

In other words, Jesus wanted them to learn that God would provide for them as they went out to evangelize the world. It was a lesson they would need as they continued the work after the ascension of Jesus.
 
Jesus also told them to shake the dust off their feet if a town did not receive them. This is what Jews did after leaving a Gentile land. It was a symbol of not carrying their defilement with you. In this case it was also a subtle sign of the kingdom. The kingdom of God would be composed of those who believed in and followed Jesus, not those who were Jews by physical birth. Those who rejected the message of the apostles would not have a place in the kingdom of God.

I remember once in college, two Christian groups got together to go and witness to our professors. I went with a friend to a psychology professor’s office to talk to him. He basically threw us out. In the hallway, I ceremonially dusted off my heels to the amusement of my friend.

Luke also tells us the Twelve did what Jesus commanded, preaching in the villages and healing. They expanded the ministry of Jesus with authority from Jesus. 

9:7-9
Herod Becomes Aware of Jesus

At this point, Jesus has become so well known that King Herod heard about him. He was called Herod the Tetrarch because the Romans gave him one fourth of the kingdom of his father, Herod the Great, at his death. HIs name was Herod Antipator.

No doubt, Herod heard about the healings and teachings. However, the people who spoke to Herod were confused about Jesus’ identity. They reported it was Elijah or another prophet raised from the dead. Some even said it was John the Baptist raised from the dead.
 
Herod was, understandably, confused. He wanted to see Jesus. It may well be that he was afraid Jesus was John the Baptist come back from the dead for revenge.

Luke does a good job here of foreshadowing trouble to come in the future by showing us Herod’s awareness of Jesus, his confusion about Jesus’ identity and his desire to understand.

Feeding Five Thousand
9:10-17

This event occurred when the Twelve returned from their mission trip. Jesus took them to Bethsaida, evidently with the intent of listening to what they had done and having time with them. However, the crowds learned where they were and followed them. (10)

Jesus did not tell them to go away because he and the Twelve had things to do. Instead, he welcomed them. (11) He taught them about the kingdom of God. He healed the sick. He did this all day long.

At the end of the day, The Twelve told Jesus to send the crowd away for food and lodging. (12) The reason for this is not given. It may be that the Twelve wanted to call it a day, so they wanted Jesus to wrap it up. In the alternative, they may have been concerned for people who had been there all day and would have to travel home in the dark with no food and no place along the way to stay. 

Jesus did not go along with their idea. Instead, he commanded the apostles to give the crowd something to eat. They canvassed the crowed for food and came up with only five loaves of bread and two fish. Evidently, this was a kid’s sack lunch. They also brought up the idea of getting take out, going and buying food. They surely did not have enough money for that, since there were about five thousand men there, along with a number of women and children.

The apostles were trying to obey Jesus. But they only went about it in practical, physical ways. They tried to find food in the crowd. They suggested an alternative, although an untenable one. They did not look beyond the practical. They also did not think about the lesson they had just learned on their mission trip: that God will provide for those who preach and minister in his name.

Jesus, on the other hand, took what the disciples had and multiplied it into enough to feed the crowd. He also made enough leftovers to have 12 baskets, no doubt one for each of the Twelve who were still limited in their thinking.

God had miraculously provided food to his people before this. He fed the Israelites in the desert with manna and quail. (Exodus 16-18)

The Lord also fed 100 prophets who followed Elisha with 20 loaves of barley and some grain from a man’s sack. (2 Kings 4:42) These events, along with Jesus feeding the five thousand, are things only God could do.

Or does it also show that the disciples could do with the authority and power of Jesus given to them?

 These events also show us Jesus’ compassion for people. He was not willing to send them away angry. He was not willing to make them fend for themselves.

It also shows us something of the nature and character of the Father. Jesus revealed the Father to us. John 1:18 says “No one has ever seen God; the only God, who is at the Father’s side, he has made him known”. As Jesus had compassion on the crowds and met their physical needs, so the Father cares for us, has compassion for us and provides for our physical needs. 1 Peter 5:7 tells us to cast or anxieties on God because he cares for us. 


Sunday, February 26, 2017

JESUS' AUTHORITY OVER ALL - LUKE 8:22-56

The remainder of chapter 8 concerns three miracles showing the authority of Jesus over nature, over demons and over death.

Authority Over the Storm
8:22-25

This is one of the most allegorically preached passages in the New Testament. The sermon titles usually say something like “Jesus Can Calm the Storms In Your Life”. However, if we look at this as an expositor, we will see that is not the main message.

After speaking to the large crowd, and explaining things to his disciples, he wanted to cross the lake. They all got in a boat and Jesus went to sleep. While he was sleeping, a storm came up and stirred up the waves. They began to take on water and worried the they would sink and drown. Since several of these guys (Peter, Andrew, James and John) were fishermen, at home on the water, the storm must have been fierce.

They woke Jesus up to tell him they were going to die. This seems to mean they thought he could help them. And crying out to Jesus when we are in danger is what he wants us to do.

Jesus “rebuked” the wind and waves and the storm immediately ceased. In doing this, Jesus showed his deity. The disciples knew that God had authority over the sea and controlled it. The Old Testament had many examples of this. The big event in the history of God’s deliverance of Israel was the exodus from Egypt, including God’s parting of the Red Sea so that they could pass. Exodus 14:21-22 says “…the LORD drove the sea back…and the people of Israel went into the midst of the sea on dry ground…”

In Job 38, the Lord told Job he shut in the sea with doors, prescribed limits for it and said “thus far shall you come and no farther”.

Psalm 95:5 says “the sea is his, for he made it”.

Psalm 107:29 says “He made the storm be still and the waves of the sea were hushed.”

Thus, when Jesus controlled the sea, he exercised a power and authority possessed only by God. He was, therefore, declaring his deity by his actions. The disciples at least knew that only God could do this. You can tell this by their reaction. First of all, they were afraid. They were not afraid Jesus would hurt them. They were afraid, as men and women always are, when they see a great act of God’s power.  They were in awe. Second, they marveled that the waves and the wind obeyed him, saying “who then is this”. For, they knew no mortal man could do this. This is the main point of the story. Who is this Jesus? He is God.

By this time in Jesus’ ministry, his disciples had seen him do many miracles. He had healed the sick and raised the dead. So, they had to have some inkling that he was more than a mere man. Yet, this demonstration made it clear.

Not only did Jesus rebuke the storm, he rebuked his disciples. Despite the fact that the disciples went to Jesus for help, they only did it as a last resort, after their own efforts failed. Also, they did it believing that, if they did not wake him, he would let them all perish. And so Jesus rebuked them, saying “where is your faith?” .

In contrast to the disciples, Jesus slept through the storm. He was at peace, trusting in the care of his Father in heaven.

Notice also that Jesus took them into the storm. He is the one who said for them to go across the lake to the other side. Although there is some popular teaching that Jesus will prevent all bad things from happening to you, he in fact will test your faith and give you opportunities to trust him. That is one way we grow in spiritual maturity.

Authority Over demons
8:26-39

In this story, Jesus and the disciples sailed across the lake to the country of the Gerasenes. There Jesus met a man possessed by demons. He had so many demons they called themselves “Legion”. He was living among the tombs, running around naked and generally being a nuisance. The Holy Spirit builds up the believer. The evil spirits break down those they oppress.

When the man encountered Jesus, the demons spoke through him, begging Jesus not to torment them. The demons knew who Jesus was. They are fallen angels. They follow Satan. And they knew he had authority over them. That is why they begged him for mercy.

Notice that the demons begged Jesus not to send them back into the “abyss”. (31) This is a word for the place where Satan and his demons will be kept for eternity. (Revelation 20:1-3) This should tell you something. If even the demons do not want to go there, you certainly do not want to go there.

Jesus “gave them permission” to stay on earth and not return to the abyss, so they went into a herd of pigs. That caused the pigs to drown themselves in the lake. Jesus is Lord over both the natural and supernatural, or spiritual, world.

Note again the reaction to Jesus. The people in the area were seized with great fear. (37) They realized no ordinary man could do this. So, they wanted him to leave.

The man who was delivered reacted differently. He wanted to follow Jesus. He was grateful. He, like the woman who washed Jesus’ feet, loved much as he was delivered from much.

Jesus did not let the man follow him. Rather, he sent him home to be a missionary or evangelist. He instructed the man to tell people how much God had done for him. And he did. (39)

Do you think this was an accidental encounter? It does not seem so. Jesus would have no reason to go to Gesara. It was not a Jewish area and Jesus preached primarily to Jews. Rather, it seems apparent that Jesus went there for the purpose of meeting this man, delivering him from demons, and sending him to be a witness.

Authority Over Illness and Death
8:40-56

In this story, Jesus returned from Gesara. He was met by a crowd of people again. In this crowd was a man whose only daughter was dying. She was only 12 years old. Also in this crowd was a woman who had been bleeding for 12 years.

The man was no ordinary man. He was “a ruler of the synagogue” named Jairus. (41) As ruler of the synagogue, he would have been in charge of the services, determining what songs would be sung and what scriptures would be read, as well as who would be allowed to speak. He was, thus, important in religious affairs.

But this man was also desperate. He fell at Jesus’ feet and implored him to come to his house. (42) And Jesus went, thus granting the man’s request. (42) But he did it in an odd fashion. You would expect him to rush to the man’s house and heal the daughter before she died. But that is not what Jesus did.

Instead, as people pressed in around him, he stopped because he noticed that someone had touched him. The disciples thought that was silly, since there were people all around. But, in fact, a woman had touched the fringe of his garment and was immediately healed. (44) Jesus knew that power had gone out from him. (46)

The woman finally came forward and admitted what she had done. Jesus told her that her faith had made her well and told her to go in peace. Jesus always responded positively to those who believed in him.

In the world’s eyes, this woman was not important. In fact, she was an outcast due to her bleeding. But to Jesus, she was important.

Now, remember Jairus. While all of this was going on, Jairus is standing there wishing Jesus would hurry up and get to his house and heal his daughter before it was too late. Not only that, he was an important man waiting on Jesus to deal with an outcast. Then, his worst fear comes true. People came and said that the daughter had died.

Jesus’ response to that was not “too bad, we did not make it in time”. Instead, he told Jairus not to fear, but to believe and she would be well. (50) In other words, Jesus said do not let the outward circumstances cause you to doubt me, or my power, or my faithfulness. Evidently, Jairus did believe.

Indeed, Jesus went into the house and raised her. (54) The people there did not believe Jesus, showing it by laughing at him when he said she was not dead but sleeping. (53)

Another thing to notice here is that Jesus only took three of the disciples into the house with him. He had reduced the crowds to 12 disciples to be his closest followers. Now he reduced that to three, Peter John and James for this special event. He would do this again at his transfiguration and in the Garden of Gethsemene.

What do these three stories tell us? First, Jesus is divine and has authority over all of creation. This includes all forces of nature, of illness, of demons and even death itself. This will be important to the next event, his sending the apostles on a mission trip. Remember, the beginning of the Great Commission is Jesus’ statement that all authority in heaven and on earth was given to him. (Matthew 28:18)

Second, although our natural tendency is to be afraid when bad things are happening, Jesus does not want us to be afraid.

Third in place of fear, he wants faith. He wants us to trust him. He chastised the disciples for lack of faith. He praised the woman who touched him for her faith. He told Jairus to believe and not be afraid.

In the boat and in the death of the daughter, Jesus in effect told people to disregard the apparent problem, that thing that seemed hopeless to the physical eye and mind. They were to disregard the apparent physical reality and replace it with the spiritual reality that Jesus is Lord over all.


Tuesday, February 21, 2017

“The collapse in evangelical doctrinal consensus is intimately related to the collapse in the understanding of, and role assigned to, Scripture as God's Word spoken within the church."

― Carl R. Trueman, Reformation: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow

Sunday, February 19, 2017

HEARING JESUS - LUKE 8:16-20

A Second Parable - The Lamp
8:16-18

Since many Bible versions put a title for this paragraph, it is easy to think it is a new topic. But it is not. It is still speaking of those who listen to the teaching of Jesus. But it is a second illustration Jesus used to press his point.



Jesus said no one lights a lamp and covers it to hide the light. Rather, they set it up on a table to be seen. In other words, when you have something that is useful, you use it. The gospel, the message of Jesus, was meant to be used. It was not meant to be hidden.

Some people sit in church for decades. They hear the gospel repeatedly. But it has no impact on them. They do not change. They do not practice the Christian life.

Many people have heard the golden rule and the Sermon on the Mount, but they do not practice the principles of either. They are mean, selfish and complacent.

Hearing is not enough. Lip service is not enough. Jesus wants us to hear and obey his word. First we obey by receiving him as Savior and Lord. Second, we obey him by living according to his principles.

I once heard a preacher say, when we get to heaven we will be surprised at who is not there. We are accountable for hearing Jesus’ words. He said nothing is hidden that will not be made manifest, everything  that is not known will come to light. (17) This is not a new concept from Jesus. Ecclesiates 12:13-14 says “Fear God and keep his commandment, for this is the whole duty of man. For God will bring every deed into judgment, with every secret thing, whether good or evil.” Paul carried the thought along when he wrote “God judges the secrets of men by Christ Jesus”, referring to the final judgment. (Romans 2:16)

Jesus went on to say “take care then how you hear, for to the one who has, more will be given, and from the one who has not, even what he things that he has will be taken away”. (8:18) The one who hears the words of Jesus and puts them into practice receives salvation and sanctification as he grows in maturity in Christ. When you are the good soil, when your hear and apply the Word to yourself, you will understand more and more of God’s truth. You bear fruit with patience. (15)

That is why you can read the Bible over and over and still see new things and understand things for the first time. Proverbs 9:9 says “Give instruction to a wise man and he will be still wiser; teach a righteous man and he will increase in learning.”

The one who hears the words of Jesus but does not do anything with it, will lose what knowledge and understanding they have, and will lose everything in the end. Jesus said “what he things that he has will be taken away”. (18)

Jesus’ Family
8:19-20

The last vignette in this lesson on listening to Jesus’ words occurs as Jesus’ mother and brothers came to him. It serves for Jesus to make his last point on this subject.

We know that Jesus had an earthy family. He had a mother and he had brothers according to this passage. We can surmise that Joseph had died at his point, since he is not mentioned. Mark even gave us names. He said his brothers were James, Joses, Judas and Simon. (Mark 6:3) Mark also mentioned sisters, but not by name.

This tells us that, once Jesus was born, Mary and Joseph lived together as a normal husband and wife. They had sex. They had children.

We also know that families can be complicated. This is especially true if we seek to serve the Lord in ways our families are not comfortable with or do not understand. This very thing happened to Jesus.

We know that Mary believed the words of the angel to her about Jesus. But, she did not understand everything. We see this when she is worried because Jesus stayed in the temple to discuss scripture with the Rabbis and Mary could not find him.

The episode in our current passage seems to indicate this also. Luke did not tell us why Mary and the brothers came on this occasion. However, Mark wrote that they went out to seize Jesus because they thought he was out of his mind. (Mark 3:21) John wrote that his brothers did not believe in him. (John 7:5)

When his family came to get him, they could not get to him because of the crowd. But one of the disciples told him they were there. Jesus’ reply seems harsh at first. He said “my mother and my brothers are those who hear the word of God and do it”. (21)

When we get Jesus’ point, we see it is not that harsh and is certainly true. His main point is that God’s family is composed of those of good soil, of the displayed lamp; those who hear the word of God and do it. He was driving home his message that his disciples must be receptive of his word and obedient to it.

Those of us who receive Christ and his message of salvation are given the blessing of becoming part of God’s family. We become his children. John 1:12-13 says “But to all who did receive him, who believed in his name, he gave the right to become children of God, who were born, not of blood, nor the will of the flesh nor of the will of man, but of God.” Galatians 3:26 says “For in Christ Jesus you are all sons of God, through faith”.

Romans 8:16 says “The Spirit himself bears witness with our spirit that we are children of God”. 1 John 3:1 says “See what kind of love the Father has given to us, that we should be called children of God; and so we are”.

Jesus even taught us to address God in prayer as “Father”. He said “Pray then like this: Our Father in heaven…” . (Matthew 6:9)

This concept is “adoption”, or the doctrine of adoption. Because God adopts believers into his family as his children, we have special privileges. First, we get to relate to him as a loving Father, not as a remote taskmaster or even as a judge. We are no longer slaves, but sons. (Galatians 4:7)

As his children, we are also heirs. (Galatians 4:7) We have an inheritance the Father keeps for us in heaven. It is eternal life. (1 Peter 1:4)

We also have the privilege of being made like Christ. We are led by the Holy Spirit. (Romans 8:14) And we are disciplined in love. (Hebrews 12:5-7)

A note of caution is needed here. Although Jesus is the Son of God and we are adopted as God’s sons, or children, we do not have the same relationship with the Father as Jesus does.

The Father is the first person of the Trinity, the Son the second. God gives us this picture of Father and Son to help us understand them and their relationship. But they are both eternal. They are of the same divine substance. They are different persons of the same Godhead.

We are not and never will be God. But he adopts us as children in the sense of creating a new relationship with us based on his love and our faith.